The Death of the Author, readings

Since noone gave any suggestions, here is my idea for what we’re to discuss on thursday (4pm in the Mack foyer, still don’t know where to go from there).

We’re getting a little heavier this week, with four philosophical texts that are quite widely recognized.

Roland Barthes, ‘The Death of the Author’ in Aspen, no. 5-6 (1967)

This would be the main text, and it can be found easily on the world wide web, the above links are only two of the places. So do at least try to read this one. There is also a wikipedia article on it which may put it into context for you. Then I found three texts in Art In Theory that I think would all be worth your time. Take 30 min every evening this week to skim through and you’ll be well prepared for discussiontime!

Jacques Lacan, ‘The Mirror-Phase as Formative of the Function of the I‘ in Art In Theory 1900-2000, pp. 620-624

Michel Foucault, ‘What Is an Author?’ in Art In Theory 1900-2000, pp. 949-953

Rosalind Krauss, ‘The Originality of the Avant-Garde‘ in Art In Theory 1900-2000, pp. 1032-1037

(the links provided to the Foucault and Krauss texts include the full original texts, whereas the Art In Theory-versions of those are more easily digested excerpts.)

That’s it kids, get reading!

And do sign up for a wordpress-username, and then leave a comment to this post and I’ll add you as contributors. It feels rather daunting that I should keep this going all by myself…

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Interim readings…

Here is a PDF of an article that Noam has translated and recommends you all to read:

The Office As Studio

I would also like to advertise my blog Pränt, which is my archive of written words, quotes or small texts that I find extra poignant. At the moment, the three quotes on top are all from texts we discussed last week; a very condensed summary of what I got out of the first reading group I guess.

As for texts for next week (the vote seems to be for Originality and the Death of the Author) I have yet to get any suggestions from you, so I will once again flick through Art In Theory tonight to see what I can find…

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Next meeting

Vote, and then suggest texts if you’ve got any!

Next meeting will be on thursday the 10th of march at 4pm. If anyone has an idea of where would be a good space for it, please share.

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Reading Group meeting #1

Our first group discussion was held in the CCA café on thursday the 24th of february. With an attendance of six (Petter, Becca, Noam, Yvonne, Alex and Cat) we talked on the topic of Art & Politics, based on our reading of the following four short texts:

‘The Social Bases of Art’ by Meyer Shapiro. pp. 514-518 in Art In Theory 1900-2000

‘The Artist and Politics’ by various artists, for Artforum. pp. 922-926 in Art In Theory 1900-2000

‘I Am Searching For Field Character’ by Joseph Beuys. pp. 929-930 in Art In Theory 1900-2000

‘Art and Politics’ by Ana Mendieta. pp. 1064-1065 in Art In Theory 1900-2000

The discussion was engaging and I would describe this first meeting as very successful. I hope that more people will want to join in the future. But we will need to find a better space to do this, as CCA felt slightly too busy and the table just about big enough for the six of us.

(click the link on the Beuys text to download a PDF-version of it)

Here's us, having a great time pondering the responsibility of being a socially engaged artist in a postmodern world

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Welcome readers!

This is the blog for a reading group started by Painting & Printmaking Yr 3, in 2011.

It is intended as a complement to our biweekly discussions. Here, anyone participating can post suggestions on further reading, continue the discussion in written form, or link to relevant discussions elsewhere. It is also intended as an archive of what we’ve discussed so far, so that those who miss out on a meeting can keep up to date.

Let the pretentious blabbering commence!

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